The Versatile Rocking Chair

wikimedia commons
wikimedia commons

It’s hard to find a piece of furniture with more American associations than the rocking chair.  In fact, rockers were around in late-17th-century England, but they proliferated in the American colonies during the early 18th century.

Whatever their true origins, rockers was certainly popular in the United States by the early 1800s, when several British travelers’ accounts described the chair that could be “found wherever Americans sit down,” as Frances Anne Butler put it in 1835. In 1844, a British commentator in a Vermont newspaper described the furniture as “of exclusive American contrivance and use,” and extolled the “comfort and luxurious ease of these wooden narcotics.”

Some of the earliest rocking chairs were formed from regular chairs with wooden rockers added to their legs. These prototypical rockers were perhaps inspired by cradles, which had existed for centuries. The first adult rocking chairs were likely used to rock children to sleep by nurses or mothers. In 19th-century art and early photographs rocking chairs were associated with women and few men were shown sitting in them.

The earliest rocking chairs often had thick, tall rockers that extended equidistantly behind and in front of the chair legs. As the 18th century progressed, the rockers tended to extend further behind the chair than in front and became narrower and more graceful in shape.

The perennially popular Windsor chairs, introduced to America from England in 1720, were commonly used to make rockers. These chairs, marked by the several spindles to support the back, sometimes had another layer of spindles known as “combs” added at the top to make the rocking chair taller and allow the user to rest their head. Cushions were routinely added to make the wooden chairs more comfortable. Another early and distinctive rocking chair was the Acadian, a Canadian chair marked by square or rectangular leg posts and low or no arms.

By the beginning of the 19th century, rocking chairs were becoming better engineered and ergonomic. Perhaps the most famous and ubiquitous design from this era—and one that is still being made today—was the Boston rocking chair, whose seat formed an S-shape with its front lip rolling down and its back lip rolling up. The seat was much more comfortable and supportive of the lower back than its predecessors and was later described by furniture chronicler Wallace Nutting as “the most popular chair ever made.”

The Shakers were also producing furniture during this period. Among their most recognized objects was their rocking chair, a slate-back, narrow chair made of birch or maple. The seats were made of splint, rush, cane, or woven tape. Per the Shaker style, there was a distinct lack of ornamentation (with the exception of a pair of plain finials at the top of the chair’s back) in order not to detract from the purity of form.

In the second quarter of the 19th century, rocking chairs became more elaborately ornamented and ever more comfortable. Many rocking chairs at the time were decorated in the Empire style, painted a dark color and then ornamented with gold and bronze metallic powders stenciled into popular motifs such as scrolls, flowers, birds, and cornucopias. Connecticut furniture maker Lambert Hitchcock was an early adherent to this aesthetic, so chairs made in this style are often generically referred to as Hitchcock chairs.

In 1860, production started on one of the most successful rocking chairs of all time, the bentwood rocker. Invented in Austria by cabinet-maker Michael Thonet, the chairs were marked by their multiple and decorative curves of beech, within which were fabric slings for the seat, back, and arms. These now-classic chairs have been constructed almost continuously ever since, with a short hiatus only during World War II.

About the same time, inventors began patenting rockers with new mechanisms, such as folding rockers and office-chair rockers. Platform rockers also came into vogue, with a stationary bottom that the rocking chair was suspended above. These chairs, which preceded similar modern-day recliners and swivel rockers, saved space, were easy on carpets, and could be disguised as a more formal armchair.

Around the beginning of the 20th century, the Arts & Crafts movement swept the nation, and with it came Mission rocking chairs by Gustav Stickley, his rival brothers, and Charles and Henry Greene. Like other products of the period, Mission rocking chairs were a move away from mass-produced furniture and toward craftsmanship. Generally made of oak, Mission-style rockers were famous for their sturdiness, comfort, and simplicity.

A decade or so into the 20th century, U.S. furniture designers began revisiting the past by producing products in the colonial style. Reproductions came into vogue, often gussied up with more elaborate décor than the antiques they were based upon. Then, after World War II, the Mid-century Modern era and its austere aesthetic arrived, producing ultra-simplistic and modular furniture. The most famous rocking chair from this era was by Charles and Rae Eames, whose molded-fiberglass seat and bent-wire frame sat atop a pair of slender and tapered wooden rockers.

source: Antique and Vintage Rocking Chairs

http://www.collectorsweekly.com/furniture/rocking-chairs

 

One thought on “The Versatile Rocking Chair

  1. Skype has established its online-dependent consumer beta on the entire world,
    right after starting it generally inside the U.S.
    and U.K. earlier this four weeks. Skype for Online also now works with Linux and Chromebook for immediate online
    messaging communication (no voice and video yet, these require a
    connect-in set up).

    The expansion of your beta provides help for an extended selection of languages to aid bolster that global functionality

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s